Posts Tagged ‘books for young readers’

How to Dress Like Gilda Joyce (or: How to Shop in Your Own Closet)

Monday, October 31st, 2011

A Gilda Joyce fan in costume

Finally, my favorite holiday of the year has arrived! This year, I’m thinking of dressing up as my best friend Wendy Choy (partly just to annoy her) or my neighbor, Mrs. Frickle. (And yes, Mrs. Frickle still owns that pink wig!) I’m leaning toward Mrs. Frickle for obvious reasons.

Some inspired readers have emailed me wondering how they can create their own Gilda Joyce costume. To them, I say: congratulations on picking one of the most fun and flexible costumes you can find!

As you probably know, I am a sleuth of many styles. In fact, a Gilda Joyce spy-girl costume is truly a “dress-up-at-the-last-minute-and-still-look-fabulous” solution for those of us who need to “shop in our own closets.”

HOW TO DRESS UP LIKE GILDA JOYCE:

1. A must: cat’s-eye sunglasses (you can find these at lots of party stores or costume stores)

2. A wig of some kind (kind of messy-looking is best, although I like ALL wigs)

3. Long strand of fake pearls or other inexpensive costume jewelry

4. A reporter’s notebook and pen and/or pair of binoculars as a prop.

5. Fancy shoes with heels (but make sure you can walk!)

6. Something with leopard print if you can find it, or some other flamboyant accessory, like a colorful scarf.

7. A vintage dress if you can find one — or something that resembles an old evening gown that you found in someone’s attic. A tip: Gilda readers know that I love to make discoveries in unexpected places. When looking for a Gilda Joyce costume, you might make some great “finds” in your grandma’s closet as well as at vintage clothing stores and costume stores.

8. Some red lipstick, fake fingernails, and/or false eyelashes if you want to be Gilda-in-disguise.

9. Finally, be sure to take along one of your favorite Gilda Joyce mysteries so that when people ask you, “Who are you supposed to be?” you can pull out your book and point to the cover! :)

Finally, and don’t forget to send me a picture once you’re wearing your costume! I can’t wait to see it!

Happy haunting!

Love,

Gilda Joyce

Gilda’s “Up All Night” Famous Chocolate Fudge Cookies!

Monday, May 16th, 2011

Okay, I’ve been gone for a while, and I appreciate the many notes asking whether I fell into a ditch, whether I was hit by a bus, and other gentle and not-so-gentle inquiries as to my whereabouts.

Suffice it to say, ladies and gentlemen, that when you read my next adventure (my fingers are still sore from typing it), those questions will be answered, and you will be AMAZED that I am even still here to type at all. And the answer to one of the above questions is “yes,” by the way. But probably not in the way you’d expect.

How’s that for being vague? Read THE BONES OF THE HOLY on June 10th to find out more….

But on to more important matters. For those of you who are studying for final exams or getting “spring fever,” and just plain tired of doing your homework, I thought I’d offer you something to help you stay perky during the final weeks of the school year.

That’s right, I told you I would post some recipes, and I didn’t lie. It took me a lifetime to get the work done, but I’m finally going to reveal…. TA DA!

Gilda Joyce’s “UP ALL NIGHT” Famous Chocolate Fudge Cookie Recipe
Note: We writers should give credit to our sources, and my “Up All Night” cookies are not solely the result of my own late-night, chocolate-fueled writing sessions. My favorite chocolate cookie recipe is based on a recipe in Craig Common’s wonderful cookbook, The Common Grill Cookbook, which I highly recommend. And hey – if you visit Chelsea, Michigan, make sure to eat at the Common Grill! You’ll no longer believe people when they insist that the words “Michigan” and “yummy” don’t fit in the same sentence!

NOTE: for best results, consume two cookies along with a double latte. Now—get back to that term paper or the last chapter of that novel-in-progress!

1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
1 cup unsweetened cocoa
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup semisweet chocolate pieces
½ cup unsweetened chocolate
1 2/3 cups brown sugar
2/3 cup butter
4 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla

Preheat oven to 300 degrees.

Sift together four, cocoa, baking soda, and salt.

Over medium heat, in bottom half of double boiler, heat 1 inch of water; do not boil. (Set aside.)
Place semisweet chocolate pieces and unsweetened chocolate in top half of double boiler and melt slowly. Remove from heat and stir until smooth. (Set aside.)

Set mixer to medium speed and cream brown sugar and butter in large mixing bowl for 1 minute. Scrape sides of bowl and continue mixing while adding eggs one at a time, until combined. Add vanilla and beat for 30 seconds. Add melted chocolate and beat for 10 seconds.

Slowly add sifted flour mixture to creamed mixture and continue to beat for 30 seconds. Scrape down sides with rubber spatula.

Drop 2 tablespoons per cookie onto cookie sheet, spaced 2 inches apart, and bake for 15 minutes. Cool.

If you don’t know what to do next, I can’t help you.

Are You Ready to Get Published?

Sunday, February 13th, 2011

From time to time in this blog, I will turn my attention to some of the letters and requests for advice I’ve received. One of the more familiar questions goes something like this:

“Dear Gilda,

I think you’re awesome! More importantly:

HOW DO I GET PUBLISHED?”

To which I respond: “Are you sure you’re READY to be published?”

“Of course I am, Gilda!” you answer. “I have such a cute idea for a novel, and I’ve heard that people like J.K. Rowling and the writer of those Twilight books make millions. I would have no problem spending that cash, Gilda, and I wouldn’t blow it all on Twinkies and lip gloss, either.

The Bones of the Holy will be published in June, 2011.

“So how about it, Gilda?” you say. “When is it going to be MY turn? HOW ABOUT ME?!”

“Fine,” I reply, “I will tell you how to get published, but first you must perform five feats of superhuman strength.”

Just kidding. What I actually tell you is: “Before you think about how to get published, you should first be able to few simple but oh-so-difficult and crucial steps”:

BEFORE SEEKING A PUBLISHER, PLEASE MAKE SURE YOU CAN CHECK OFF THE FOLLOWING ITEMS ON YOUR “TO-DO” LIST:

1. You have finished writing your entire first book (for a novel, this will usually be approximately 200 pages in length or longer).

2. You are aware that most authors do not publish the first draft of their manuscript, and you have faced the gruesome task of revising your own work. (See my previous blog entry on REVISION MADE EASY for tips on revising your work.)

3. You have shown your manuscript to several avid readers (meaning people who actually read entire books for fun) including at least one trustworthy adult who is not related to you. Seek out opinions from young readers, but include people who are not your closest friends. Your friends know they have to love your manuscript; otherwise you’ll stop texting them and sitting next to them in the cafeteria. (Note: see the website www.spillinginkthebook.com for great tips on how to start a writing club.)

4. You are willing to listen to and consider the comments and feedback you receive without storming out of the room or dissolving into tears.  (Believe me, this is harder than it sounds. But you’ll hear even more comments from a real editor, so toughen up and get used to it!)

“But Gilda,” you say, “This is your most depressing blog entry ever. I can’t check off anything on that list yet! Are you saying that I’m not a writer?!”

Of course not. You’re a writer when you actively work at the craft of writing, not merely because you’re published. There’s one thing that we writers all have in common: we write. And every time we start a new book, we’re starting over, from ground zero. In fact, sometimes book number five is even harder than book number one.

“But darn it, Gilda,” you say, stomping your foot, “I REALLY WANT TO GET PUBLISHED RIGHT NOW!”

“Of course you do,” I say, wiping the ink stains from your fingers and the drool from your chin. “But have you ever considered that what you really want—and what you could have right now—is an audience for your writing?”

We writers can be reclusive creatures, and personally, I love knowing that my secret stash of unpublished manuscripts is hiding in my closet, just waiting to be discovered someday. Still, there comes a point when you need to share your stories with other demented individuals. (That was a joke, for those of you who don’t know my sense of humor.)

Some suggestions for finding your audience:

1. Create a website or start a blog to share your writing and that of your friends. We live in an exciting, dynamic, and strange time in the history of publishing, so take advantage of it. (When in history could an “unpublished” writer reach such a large audience so quickly?)

2. Start an after-school or weekend writing club. Sometimes it’s heartwarming to meet with other writers in person –not just online.

3. Try sending chapters of your novel-in-progress to a friend in installments (I once sent my friend Wendy a novel in weekly chapters that kept her laughing all summer.My creative writing teacher hated the book, but Wendy is still begging me to write book #2 in the never-published Penelope Stunn series.)

So keep writing, but until you can check off each item on my handy list, my advice is to focus on finding your audience rather than “getting published.”

“But Gilda—” someone shouts from the back row. “What about those of us who CAN check off every item on that list?” A spitball whisks past my head as I turn to answer.

But just in time, the bell rings.

Sorry folks; another session has ended, and we’re out of time. But tune in to my next blog for yet another answer to the eternal question that has driven brilliant minds to near-insanity:

“HOW DO I GET PUBLISHED?”

“I WANT A DO-OVER!” GILDA’S GUIDE TO REVISION MADE EASY

Monday, August 23rd, 2010

Now that it’s almost time to go back to school, it’s time for me to set aside my cat’s-eye sunglasses, SPF 200 sunscreen, spy stories (both real and imagined), and turn to a writing topic I usually avoid.

Revision.

There, I said it. Now that I see the word sitting there on the page all by itself, I see it’s not such a bad word after all. In fact, it almost sounds pretty.

Still, I avoid it.

Whenever one of my stories doesn’t work out I prefer to simply move on to the next idea—the next journey. To me, what’s interesting and fun about writing is inspiration, discovery, and self-expression. Sometimes I think the best part of writing is that exciting first moment—the moment you wonder WHAT IF…?

What if that guy I’ve been staring at in chemistry class suddenly broke up with his girlfriend and asked me out on a date?

What if I suddenly sprouted wings during my sleep, and when I woke up, I could actually fly?

What if I discovered that I could hear everyone’s thoughts?

What if my best friend and I ran away to join the circus?

Compared to the “what if” stage of the writing process, the revision stage feels like the moment your mom announces that you aren’t allowed to attend the best party of the year. Instead, she hands you a toilet plunger and a broom and tells you to get busy cleaning the bathroom.

But before you stop reading this blog in disgust, I have a secret to share. Unlike cleaning the bathroom, revision actually gets EASIER if you wait a few days, weeks, or months before starting the job. Can you believe it? A case when procrastination actually pays off?

In fact, whenever I’ve just finished writing a fantastic story that I’m dying to share with Wendy and my English teacher, I stop myself. Even though I’m imagining everyone turning cartwheels, congratulating me and slapping me on the back, I remind myself that I could probably improve the story just a teensy bit if I wait a few days and then read it again. So I hide it at the bottom of my sock drawer (where nobody would ever bother to look) and take it out after two whole weeks.

When I re-read the story, I usually still love the characters, but I still find a bunch of things I could improve.

“What are you talking about, Gilda?” I can hear you asking me. “I don’t have two weeks to stick my writing in a sock drawer! My paper on the history of origami is due tomorrow morning at 9:00 AM!!”

In that case, I admit that the revision tips I’m about to share probably won’t help you very much. Instead, you need to read the recipe for “Gilda’s Up-All-Night Chocolate Cookie Surprise,” which I will post as soon as I find myself sitting at the computer at 10:00 PM with an English paper due the next day. Once school starts, you won’t have to wait long to read that one!

But for those two or three of you out there who have NOT waited until the very last minute to do your writing homework—or for those of you who are working on an independent writing project to make your New York publishing debut—do yourself a favor and check out the following GILDA’S GUIDE TO REVISION MADE EASY:

*GILDA’S GUIDE TO REVISION MADE EASY

Remember—your sock drawer is your friend.

I know: you’ve just finished your first novel and you’re so excited, you can’t even sit still. Your grandma loves the old lady character. Your dog can’t stop licking the pages in appreciation of all the popcorn you ate while writing that fifteenth chapter. You have the envelopes addressed—ready to send off to J.K. Rowling’s publisher, the president of the United States, and the Queen of England. In short, you’re sure your story is the best thing since whipped cream in a can.

STOP. Just stick the manuscript in that drawer. Not forever, of course! Just for two weeks. Okay, at least a few days. I promise it will still be there when you go back to look for it (unless, of course, a fire, flood, or snooping relative destroys it).

“But why would you say that, Gilda?” you ask. “Wasn’t it you who encouraged me to write? Nay, and share what I have written?!”

“Because,” I answer, wiping the crumbs of frustration from the corners of your mouth, “you have no emotional distance right now. You’re too close to what you’ve written, and you’re likely to punch anyone who dares to tell you that your baby isn’t perfect. Days from now, when you pull those pages from the drawer and clear away the dust bunnies, you’ll have more mental stability. You’ll either love that story or notice things that could actually be improved.

Two weeks later…. (Imagine that last line narrated in a French accent.)

Okay, now that you’ve had a chance to look over your own work, you’re ready to share it with a trusted friend or teacher. You’re ready to actually consider any constructive comments they give you. (For more information on how to find this elusive, helpful person, see my forthcoming blog entry on “ANGELS AND EDITORS.” And sorry – I haven’t posted that one yet either. Look, I can’t solve ALL your problems in one evening!)

But before handing it off for comments, first read through the story yourself:

Do you see anything that should be clarified?

Did you notice anything that sounded hard to believe?

Are character motivations believable? Is the dialogue colorful or boring?

Now take the plunge—pick a page and start writing: see and experience the work from a renewed perspective. (I personally love to scribble in the margins of my typewritten work, but you might prefer to get a new notebook page.)

That’s right—I said writing.

“But Gilda,” you say, “I just FINISHED writing a whole manuscript. I’m DONE.”

Listen, I know just how you feel when you hear me say you are definitely NOT finished with your work. You feel like Cinderella in the castle. It’s like you just worked your butt off to finish your housework, but instead of throwing a party to celebrate your effort, the world tears down the castle walls with a wrecking ball. You’re standing there with nothing but pieces of broken plaster, a glue stick, a vacuum cleaner, and of course that same old toilet plunger your mom gave you. And of course, you’re wondering how on earth you’re going to clean up this huge mess.

Don’t despair! There’s still hope! This is the moment that separates the A papers from the C-minus papers and the professional writers from the “wanna-be” writers. If you can bite the bullet and dig in to the work, a fairy godmother of inspiration may turn up to illuminate your darkest hour. Now just put aside your tears, seize that inspiration, and push through to the end of your revision.

Repeat the process as needed.

One more tip: a funny thing might happen if you’re actually brave enough to revise your writing. Once you reach the point where your teacher is actually writing an “A” on your paper or the point at which your publisher actually wants to throw a party to celebrate your book, you’ll be happy—but not as happy as you thought you’d be.
Why? Because it’s kind of like saying “great job!” to someone who’s just finished climbing Mount Everest. The journey speaks for itself. At this point, you’ll already take genuine pride in your work no matter what comments you get.

*The author of GILDA’S GUIDE TO REVISION-MADE-EASY does not guarantee results of these habits or claim to consistently adhere to any of the above guidelines.